Course

Chemistry by CrashCourse

4.88

(33)

8h11m

Teacher

CrashCourse

Tons of awesome courses in one awesome channel! Nicole Sweeney teaches you sociology, Carrie Anne Philbin teaches you computer science, Craig Benzine teaches film history, and Mike Rugnetta is teaching mythology!

Ver sobre

Sign in or Register to access the course.

Do not worry, it is free!

Share

Evaluate course

Go to certificates

Report a problem

Course content

  • The Nucleus: Crash Course Chemistry #1

    Hank does his best to convince us that chemistry is not torture, but is instead the amazing and beautiful science of stuff. Chemistry can tell us how three tiny particles - the proton, neutron and electron - come together in trillions of combinations to form ... everything. In this inaugural episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we start out with one of the biggest ideas in chemistry ever - stuff is made from atoms. More specifically, we learn about the properties of the nucleus and why they are important to defining what an atom actually is.

    Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumbl CrashCourse. http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

    Table of Contents
    Einstein & Atoms 02:05
    Composition of Atoms 03:18
    Atomic Number 04:20
    Isotopes 08:04
    Relative Atomic Mass 07:26
    Mass Number 07:44

    Watch the SciShow episodes on the Strong Nuclear Force here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yv3EMq2Dgq8
    and
    http://www.youtube.

  • Unit Conversion & Significant Figures: Crash Course Chemistry #2

    A unit is the frequently arbitrary designation we have given to something to convey a definite magnitude of a physical quantity and every quantity can be expressed in terms of the seven base units that are contained in the international system of units. Hank thinks this is a thrilling subject, and while you may not agree, it is a subject that is very important if you want to be a scientist and communicate with accuracy and precision with other scientists. So listen up and learn something or Hank might have to kill you! (NOT REALLY!)

    Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Follow ThoughtCafe! http://www.twitter.com/ThoughtBubbler
    Tumbl Crash Course. http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

    Table of Contents
    Unit Conversion 02:27
    Scientific Notation 03:26
    Sig Figs 07:40 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • The Creation of Chemistry - The Fundamental Laws: Crash Course Chemistry #3

    Today's Crash Course Chemistry takes a historical perspective on the creation of the science, which didn't really exist until a super-smart, super-wealthy Frenchman put the puzzle pieces together - Hank tells the story of how we went from alchemists to chemists, who understood the law of conservation of mass as proposed by a decapitated aristocrat, and explains how we came to have a greater understanding of how chemical compounds work and eventually a complete understanding of what atoms and molecules are.

    Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

    Table of Contents
    Alchemists to Chemists 01:07
    Law of Conservation of Mass 03:25
    Decapitated Aristocrat 04:11
    Chemical Compounds 05:44
    Atoms and Molecules 06:07:1 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry #4

    Hank gives us a tour of the most important table ever, including the life story of the obsessive man who championed it, Dmitri Mendeleev. The periodic table of elements is a concise, information-dense catalog of all of the different sorts of atoms in the universe, and it has a wealth of information to tell us if we can learn to read it.

    Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

    Table of Contents
    Dmitri Mendeleev - 0:45
    Mendeleev's Organization of the Periodic Table - 2:31
    Relationships in the Periodic Table - 5:03
    Why Mendeleev Stood Out from his Colleagues - 7:09
    How the Periodic Table Could be Improved - 8:28

    More info. about the cylindrical periodic table of elements: http://www.av8n.com/physics/periodic-table.htm Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • The Electron: Crash Course Chemistry #5

    Hank brings us the story of the electron and describes how reality is a kind of music, discussing electron shells and orbitals, electron configurations, ionization and electron affinities, and how all these things can be understood via the periodic table.

    Crash Course on the internet!
    http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    http://TheCrashCourse.tumblr.com

    Table of Contents
    Snobby Scientists 00:43
    Great Dane/Bohr Model 01:57
    Electrons as Music 04:13
    Electron Shells and Orbitals 04:44
    Electron Configurations 05:54
    Ionization and Electron Affinities 08:17
    Periodic Table 10:18 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Stoichiometry: Chemistry for Massive Creatures - Crash Course Chemistry #6

    Chemists need stoichiometry to make the scale of chemistry more understandable - Hank is here to explain why, and to teach us how to use it.

    Table of Contents
    Atomic Mass Units 2:24
    Moles 5:12
    Molar Mass 5:59
    Equation Balancing 8:45
    Molar Ratios 11:11

    Crash Course elsewhere on the internet:
    http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

    References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-51j2 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Water and Solutions -- for Dirty Laundry: Crash Course Chemistry #7

    Dihydrogen monoxide (better know as water) is the key to nearly everything. It falls from the sky, makes up 60% of our bodies, and just about every chemical process related to life takes place with it or in it. Without it, none of the chemical reactions that keep us alive would happen - none of the reactions that sustain any life form on earth would happen - and the majority of inorganic chemical reactions that shape the surface of the earth would not happen either. Every one of us uses water for all kinds of chemistry every day - our body chemistry, our food chemistry and our laundry chemistry all take place in water.
    In today's Crash Course Chemistry, we use Hank's actual dirty laundry (ew) to learn about some of the properties of water that make it so special - it's polarity and dielectric property; how electrolytes can be used to classify solutions; and we discover how to calculate a solution's molarity as well as how to dilute a solution using the dilution equation.

    Table of Co

  • Acid-Base Reactions in Solution: Crash Course Chemistry #8

    Last week, Hank talked about how stuff mixes together in solutions. Today, and for the next few weeks, he will talk about the actual reactions happening in those solutions - atoms reorganizing themselves to create whole new substances in the processes that make our world the one we know and love. This week, we focus on acids and bases and their proton-exchanging ways.

    Table of Contents
    Chemistry Can Cause Death 00:00
    Acids and Bases are Complicated 02:25
    Conjugate Bases 05:37
    Conjugate Acids 04:48
    Acid Base Stoichiometry 06:49

    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Precipitation Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #9

    A lot of ionic compounds dissolve in water, dissociating into individual ions. But when two ions find each other that form an insoluble compound, they suddenly fall out of solution in what's called a precipitation reaction. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we learn about precipitation, precipitates, anions, cations, and how to describe and discuss ionic reactions.

    Table of Contents
    Precipitate Reactions 0:34
    Determining Precipitates 1:35
    Writing Precipitate Reactions 6:31
    Calculating Molar Mass Equation 8:52

    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Redox Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #10

    All the magic that we know is in the transfer of electrons. Reduction (gaining electrons) and oxidation (the loss of electrons) combine to form Redox chemistry, which contains the majority of chemical reactions. As electrons jump from atom to atom, they carry energy with them, and that transfer of energy is what makes all life on earth possible.

    **Special Thanks to Matt Young at the University of Montana (Geosciences Department, Environmental Biogeochemistry Lab) who helped with the chemical demonstrations.**

    Oxidation 1:42
    Reduction 1:03
    Oxidation Numbers 3:29
    Redox Reactions 5:59
    Oxidation Reactions 6:28
    Balancing Oxidation Reactions 7:18

    Also thank you to the following chemistry teachers for assistance:
    James Sarbinoff
    Rachel Wentz
    Edi González
    Lucas Moore
    Chris Conley
    Addie Clark
    Julia Rosinski

    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.t

  • How To Speak Chemistrian: Crash Course Chemistry #11

    Learning to talk about chemistry can be like learning a foreign language, but Hank is here to help with some straightforward and simple rules to help you learn to speak Chemistrian like a native.

    Table of Contents
    Determining Formulas and Names of Monatomic Ions 2:06
    Finding Cation-and Anion Forming Elements on the Periodic Table 3:29
    Writing Formulas and Naming Transition Metals 4:02
    Naming Acids and their Anions 5:35

    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • The Ideal Gas Law: Crash Course Chemistry #12

    Gases are everywhere, and this is good news and bad news for chemists. The good news: when they are behaving themselves, it's extremely easy to describe their behavior theoretically, experimentally and mathematically. The bad news is they almost never behave themselves.
    In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank tells how the work of some amazing thinkers combined to produce the Ideal Gas Law, how none of those people were Robert Boyle, and how the ideal gas equation allows you to find out pressure, volume, temperature or number of moles. You'll also get a quick introduction to a few jargon-y phrases to help you sound like you know what you're talking about.

    Table of Contents
    Ideal Gas Law Equation 0:50
    Everyone But Robert Boyle 1:35
    Ideal Gas Law to Figure Out Things 6:16
    Jargon Fun Time 7:46

    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcours

  • Ideal Gas Problems: Crash Course Chemistry #13

    We don't live in a perfect world, and neither do gases - it would be great if their particles always fulfilled the assumptions of the ideal gas law, and we could use PV=nRT to get the right answer every time. Unfortunately, the ideal gas law (like our culture) has unrealistic expectations when it comes to size and attraction: it assumes that particles do not have size at all and that they never attract each other. So the ideal gas "law" often becomes little more than the ideal gas estimate when it comes to what gases do naturally. But it's a close enough estimate in enough situations that it's very valuable to know. In this episode, Hank goes through a bunch of calculations according to the ideal gas law so you can get familiar with it.

    Table of Contents
    Large Size + Attraction to Others 3:36
    Mendeleev to the Rescue 2:30
    The Hindenburg Disaster 6:19
    Helium vs. Hydrogen 7:33
    Making Fire with Cotton and Your Fist 10:15

    --
    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook

  • Real Gases: Crash Course Chemistry #14

    Hank bursts our ideal gas law bubble, er, balloon, and brings us back to reality, explaining how the constants in the gas law aren't all that constant; how the ideal gas law we've spent the past two weeks with has to be corrected for volume because atoms and molecules take up space and for pressure because they're attracted to each other; that Einstein was behind a lot more of what we know today than most people realize; and how a Dutch scientist named Johannes van der Waals figured out those correction factors in the late 19th century and earned a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

    Table of Contents
    Constants in the Gas Laws Aren't all that Constant 1:20
    The Ideal Gas Law has to be Corrected for Volume and Pressure 3:26
    Einstein was the Bomb 5:02
    Van Der Waals Equation 9:38
    Never Give Up! 10:08

    --
    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.co

  • Partial Pressures & Vapor Pressure: Crash Course Chemistry #15

    This week we continue to spend quality time with gases, more deeply investigating some principles regarding pressure - including John Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures, vapor pressure - and demonstrating the method for collecting gas over water.

    Table of Contents
    Theory of the Atom 1:48
    Adding up the Pressures 2:34
    Mixing Vinegar & Baking Soda 7:15
    Collecting Gas Over Water 8:54

    --
    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Passing Gases: Effusion, Diffusion and the Velocity of a Gas - Crash Course Chemistry #16

    We have learned over the past few weeks that gases have real-life constraints on how they move here in the non-ideal world. As with most things in chemistry (and also in life) how a gas moves is more complex than it at first appears. In this episode, Hank describes what it means when we talk about the velocity of a gas - to understand gas velocity, we have to know what factors effect it, and how. Hank also teaches you about effusion, diffusion and concentration gradients, before showing off a cool experiment that physically demonstrates the things you have just learned. Sound exciting enough for you? Let's get started.

    *Special Thanks to Matt Young at the University of Montana (Geosciences Department, Environmental Biogeochemistry Lab) who helped with the chemical demonstrations.*

    Table of Contents
    Net Velocity vs. Average Velocity 1:17
    Effusion 4:47
    Graham's Law 5:52
    Diffusion 7:22
    Concentration Gradients 7:08
    Precipitation Reaction with Gases 8:21

    --
    Want to find Crash Course els

  • Energy & Chemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #17

    Grumpy Professor Hank admits to being wrong about how everything is chemicals. But he now wants you to listen as he blows your mind with a new sweeping statement: everything (yes, really everything this time) is energy. What?!
    This week, Hank takes us on a quick tour of how thermodynamics is applied in chemistry using his toy trebuchet as an example, because he is a proud nerd.

    --
    Table of Contents
    Everything Is Energy 0:00
    Forms of Energy 1:07
    Potential Energy 2:11
    Chemical Energy 1:55
    Energy Is Constant & Law of Thermodynamics 2:49
    System & Surroundings 5:03
    Energy Transfer 4:57
    Work 3:25
    Heat 4:05
    Trebuchets 0:48

    --
    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Enthalpy: Crash Course Chemistry #18

    Energy is like the bestest best friend ever and yet, most of the time we take it for granted. Hank feels bad for our friend and wants us to learn more about it so that we can understand what it's trying to tell us - like that any bond between two atoms contains energy. How much energy? That's not the simplest question to answer, but today Hank will answer it (kinda), by teaching us about a nifty little thing called enthalpy.

    If you are paying attention to this episode you'll learn what the state function is, and how it varies from a path-dependent function; why enthalpy change is different from heat; that bonds are energy and to form and break them they release and absorb heat to and from their environment. You'll get the quickest introduction to calorimetry ever (more on that in upcoming episodes) and learn the power of Hess's Law and how to use Germain Hess's concept of the standard enthalpy of formation to calculate exactly how much heat is produced by any chemical reaction.

    So m

  • Calorimetry: Crash Course Chemistry #19

    Today's episode dives into the HOW of enthalpy. How we calculate it, and how we determine it experimentally...even if our determinations here at Crash Course Chemistry are somewhat shoddy.

    --
    Table of Contents
    Hess' Law 2:30
    Calorimeter 3:12
    Calorimetry 3:07
    Specific Heat Capacity 5:08
    Calorimetry Sources of Error 10:21

    --
    Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
    Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
    Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
    Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

  • Entropy: Embrace the Chaos! Crash Course Chemistry #20

    Life is chaos and the universe tends toward disorder. But why? If you think about it, there are only a few ways for things to be arranged in an organized manner, but there are nearly infinite other ways for those same things to be arranged. Simple rules of probability dictate that it's much more likely for stuff to be in one of the many disorganized states than in one of the few organized states. This tendency is so unavoidable that it's known as the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Obviously, disorder is a pretty big deal in the universe and that makes it a pretty big deal in chemistry - it's such a big deal that scientists have a special name for it: entropy. In chemistry, entropy is the measure of molecular randomness, or disorder. For the next thirteen minutes, Hank hopes you will embrace the chaos as he teaches you about entropy.

    --
    Table of Contents
    Second Law of Thermodynamics :45
    Entropy 2:01
    DEMONSTRATION! 4:28
    BA(OH)2•8H2O+NH4Ci 10:25
    J.W. Gibbs & Gibbs Free Energy 7:23


    --
    Want

Course content

0h10m

The Nucleus: Crash Course Chemistry #1

Hank does his best to convince us that chemistry is not torture, but is instead the amazing and beautiful science of stuff. Chemistry can tell us how three tiny particles - the proton, neutron and electron - come together in trillions of combinations to form ... everything. In this inaugural episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we start out with one of the biggest ideas in chemistry ever - stuff is made from atoms. More specifically, we learn about the properties of the nucleus and why they are important to defining what an atom actually is.

Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumbl CrashCourse. http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents
Einstein & Atoms 02:05
Composition of Atoms 03:18
Atomic Number 04:20
Isotopes 08:04
Relative Atomic Mass 07:26
Mass Number 07:44

Watch the SciShow episodes on the Strong Nuclear Force here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yv3EMq2Dgq8
and
http://www.youtube.

0h11m

Unit Conversion & Significant Figures: Crash Course Chemistry #2

A unit is the frequently arbitrary designation we have given to something to convey a definite magnitude of a physical quantity and every quantity can be expressed in terms of the seven base units that are contained in the international system of units. Hank thinks this is a thrilling subject, and while you may not agree, it is a subject that is very important if you want to be a scientist and communicate with accuracy and precision with other scientists. So listen up and learn something or Hank might have to kill you! (NOT REALLY!)

Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Follow ThoughtCafe! http://www.twitter.com/ThoughtBubbler
Tumbl Crash Course. http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents
Unit Conversion 02:27
Scientific Notation 03:26
Sig Figs 07:40 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h10m

The Creation of Chemistry - The Fundamental Laws: Crash Course Chemistry #3

Today's Crash Course Chemistry takes a historical perspective on the creation of the science, which didn't really exist until a super-smart, super-wealthy Frenchman put the puzzle pieces together - Hank tells the story of how we went from alchemists to chemists, who understood the law of conservation of mass as proposed by a decapitated aristocrat, and explains how we came to have a greater understanding of how chemical compounds work and eventually a complete understanding of what atoms and molecules are.

Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
Alchemists to Chemists 01:07
Law of Conservation of Mass 03:25
Decapitated Aristocrat 04:11
Chemical Compounds 05:44
Atoms and Molecules 06:07:1 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h11m

The Periodic Table: Crash Course Chemistry #4

Hank gives us a tour of the most important table ever, including the life story of the obsessive man who championed it, Dmitri Mendeleev. The periodic table of elements is a concise, information-dense catalog of all of the different sorts of atoms in the universe, and it has a wealth of information to tell us if we can learn to read it.

Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents
Dmitri Mendeleev - 0:45
Mendeleev's Organization of the Periodic Table - 2:31
Relationships in the Periodic Table - 5:03
Why Mendeleev Stood Out from his Colleagues - 7:09
How the Periodic Table Could be Improved - 8:28

More info. about the cylindrical periodic table of elements: http://www.av8n.com/physics/periodic-table.htm Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h12m

The Electron: Crash Course Chemistry #5

Hank brings us the story of the electron and describes how reality is a kind of music, discussing electron shells and orbitals, electron configurations, ionization and electron affinities, and how all these things can be understood via the periodic table.

Crash Course on the internet!
http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
http://TheCrashCourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents
Snobby Scientists 00:43
Great Dane/Bohr Model 01:57
Electrons as Music 04:13
Electron Shells and Orbitals 04:44
Electron Configurations 05:54
Ionization and Electron Affinities 08:17
Periodic Table 10:18 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h12m

Stoichiometry: Chemistry for Massive Creatures - Crash Course Chemistry #6

Chemists need stoichiometry to make the scale of chemistry more understandable - Hank is here to explain why, and to teach us how to use it.

Table of Contents
Atomic Mass Units 2:24
Moles 5:12
Molar Mass 5:59
Equation Balancing 8:45
Molar Ratios 11:11

Crash Course elsewhere on the internet:
http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-51j2 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h13m

Water and Solutions -- for Dirty Laundry: Crash Course Chemistry #7

Dihydrogen monoxide (better know as water) is the key to nearly everything. It falls from the sky, makes up 60% of our bodies, and just about every chemical process related to life takes place with it or in it. Without it, none of the chemical reactions that keep us alive would happen - none of the reactions that sustain any life form on earth would happen - and the majority of inorganic chemical reactions that shape the surface of the earth would not happen either. Every one of us uses water for all kinds of chemistry every day - our body chemistry, our food chemistry and our laundry chemistry all take place in water.
In today's Crash Course Chemistry, we use Hank's actual dirty laundry (ew) to learn about some of the properties of water that make it so special - it's polarity and dielectric property; how electrolytes can be used to classify solutions; and we discover how to calculate a solution's molarity as well as how to dilute a solution using the dilution equation.

Table of Co

0h11m

Acid-Base Reactions in Solution: Crash Course Chemistry #8

Last week, Hank talked about how stuff mixes together in solutions. Today, and for the next few weeks, he will talk about the actual reactions happening in those solutions - atoms reorganizing themselves to create whole new substances in the processes that make our world the one we know and love. This week, we focus on acids and bases and their proton-exchanging ways.

Table of Contents
Chemistry Can Cause Death 00:00
Acids and Bases are Complicated 02:25
Conjugate Bases 05:37
Conjugate Acids 04:48
Acid Base Stoichiometry 06:49

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h11m

Precipitation Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #9

A lot of ionic compounds dissolve in water, dissociating into individual ions. But when two ions find each other that form an insoluble compound, they suddenly fall out of solution in what's called a precipitation reaction. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we learn about precipitation, precipitates, anions, cations, and how to describe and discuss ionic reactions.

Table of Contents
Precipitate Reactions 0:34
Determining Precipitates 1:35
Writing Precipitate Reactions 6:31
Calculating Molar Mass Equation 8:52

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h11m

Redox Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #10

All the magic that we know is in the transfer of electrons. Reduction (gaining electrons) and oxidation (the loss of electrons) combine to form Redox chemistry, which contains the majority of chemical reactions. As electrons jump from atom to atom, they carry energy with them, and that transfer of energy is what makes all life on earth possible.

**Special Thanks to Matt Young at the University of Montana (Geosciences Department, Environmental Biogeochemistry Lab) who helped with the chemical demonstrations.**

Oxidation 1:42
Reduction 1:03
Oxidation Numbers 3:29
Redox Reactions 5:59
Oxidation Reactions 6:28
Balancing Oxidation Reactions 7:18

Also thank you to the following chemistry teachers for assistance:
James Sarbinoff
Rachel Wentz
Edi González
Lucas Moore
Chris Conley
Addie Clark
Julia Rosinski

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.t

0h10m

How To Speak Chemistrian: Crash Course Chemistry #11

Learning to talk about chemistry can be like learning a foreign language, but Hank is here to help with some straightforward and simple rules to help you learn to speak Chemistrian like a native.

Table of Contents
Determining Formulas and Names of Monatomic Ions 2:06
Finding Cation-and Anion Forming Elements on the Periodic Table 3:29
Writing Formulas and Naming Transition Metals 4:02
Naming Acids and their Anions 5:35

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h09m

The Ideal Gas Law: Crash Course Chemistry #12

Gases are everywhere, and this is good news and bad news for chemists. The good news: when they are behaving themselves, it's extremely easy to describe their behavior theoretically, experimentally and mathematically. The bad news is they almost never behave themselves.
In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank tells how the work of some amazing thinkers combined to produce the Ideal Gas Law, how none of those people were Robert Boyle, and how the ideal gas equation allows you to find out pressure, volume, temperature or number of moles. You'll also get a quick introduction to a few jargon-y phrases to help you sound like you know what you're talking about.

Table of Contents
Ideal Gas Law Equation 0:50
Everyone But Robert Boyle 1:35
Ideal Gas Law to Figure Out Things 6:16
Jargon Fun Time 7:46

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcours

0h11m

Ideal Gas Problems: Crash Course Chemistry #13

We don't live in a perfect world, and neither do gases - it would be great if their particles always fulfilled the assumptions of the ideal gas law, and we could use PV=nRT to get the right answer every time. Unfortunately, the ideal gas law (like our culture) has unrealistic expectations when it comes to size and attraction: it assumes that particles do not have size at all and that they never attract each other. So the ideal gas "law" often becomes little more than the ideal gas estimate when it comes to what gases do naturally. But it's a close enough estimate in enough situations that it's very valuable to know. In this episode, Hank goes through a bunch of calculations according to the ideal gas law so you can get familiar with it.

Table of Contents
Large Size + Attraction to Others 3:36
Mendeleev to the Rescue 2:30
The Hindenburg Disaster 6:19
Helium vs. Hydrogen 7:33
Making Fire with Cotton and Your Fist 10:15

--
Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook

0h11m

Real Gases: Crash Course Chemistry #14

Hank bursts our ideal gas law bubble, er, balloon, and brings us back to reality, explaining how the constants in the gas law aren't all that constant; how the ideal gas law we've spent the past two weeks with has to be corrected for volume because atoms and molecules take up space and for pressure because they're attracted to each other; that Einstein was behind a lot more of what we know today than most people realize; and how a Dutch scientist named Johannes van der Waals figured out those correction factors in the late 19th century and earned a Nobel Prize for his efforts.

Table of Contents
Constants in the Gas Laws Aren't all that Constant 1:20
The Ideal Gas Law has to be Corrected for Volume and Pressure 3:26
Einstein was the Bomb 5:02
Van Der Waals Equation 9:38
Never Give Up! 10:08

--
Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.co

0h11m

Partial Pressures & Vapor Pressure: Crash Course Chemistry #15

This week we continue to spend quality time with gases, more deeply investigating some principles regarding pressure - including John Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures, vapor pressure - and demonstrating the method for collecting gas over water.

Table of Contents
Theory of the Atom 1:48
Adding up the Pressures 2:34
Mixing Vinegar & Baking Soda 7:15
Collecting Gas Over Water 8:54

--
Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h11m

Passing Gases: Effusion, Diffusion and the Velocity of a Gas - Crash Course Chemistry #16

We have learned over the past few weeks that gases have real-life constraints on how they move here in the non-ideal world. As with most things in chemistry (and also in life) how a gas moves is more complex than it at first appears. In this episode, Hank describes what it means when we talk about the velocity of a gas - to understand gas velocity, we have to know what factors effect it, and how. Hank also teaches you about effusion, diffusion and concentration gradients, before showing off a cool experiment that physically demonstrates the things you have just learned. Sound exciting enough for you? Let's get started.

*Special Thanks to Matt Young at the University of Montana (Geosciences Department, Environmental Biogeochemistry Lab) who helped with the chemical demonstrations.*

Table of Contents
Net Velocity vs. Average Velocity 1:17
Effusion 4:47
Graham's Law 5:52
Diffusion 7:22
Concentration Gradients 7:08
Precipitation Reaction with Gases 8:21

--
Want to find Crash Course els

0h09m

Energy & Chemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #17

Grumpy Professor Hank admits to being wrong about how everything is chemicals. But he now wants you to listen as he blows your mind with a new sweeping statement: everything (yes, really everything this time) is energy. What?!
This week, Hank takes us on a quick tour of how thermodynamics is applied in chemistry using his toy trebuchet as an example, because he is a proud nerd.

--
Table of Contents
Everything Is Energy 0:00
Forms of Energy 1:07
Potential Energy 2:11
Chemical Energy 1:55
Energy Is Constant & Law of Thermodynamics 2:49
System & Surroundings 5:03
Energy Transfer 4:57
Work 3:25
Heat 4:05
Trebuchets 0:48

--
Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h11m

Enthalpy: Crash Course Chemistry #18

Energy is like the bestest best friend ever and yet, most of the time we take it for granted. Hank feels bad for our friend and wants us to learn more about it so that we can understand what it's trying to tell us - like that any bond between two atoms contains energy. How much energy? That's not the simplest question to answer, but today Hank will answer it (kinda), by teaching us about a nifty little thing called enthalpy.

If you are paying attention to this episode you'll learn what the state function is, and how it varies from a path-dependent function; why enthalpy change is different from heat; that bonds are energy and to form and break them they release and absorb heat to and from their environment. You'll get the quickest introduction to calorimetry ever (more on that in upcoming episodes) and learn the power of Hess's Law and how to use Germain Hess's concept of the standard enthalpy of formation to calculate exactly how much heat is produced by any chemical reaction.

So m

0h11m

Calorimetry: Crash Course Chemistry #19

Today's episode dives into the HOW of enthalpy. How we calculate it, and how we determine it experimentally...even if our determinations here at Crash Course Chemistry are somewhat shoddy.

--
Table of Contents
Hess' Law 2:30
Calorimeter 3:12
Calorimetry 3:07
Specific Heat Capacity 5:08
Calorimetry Sources of Error 10:21

--
Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC...
Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

0h13m

Entropy: Embrace the Chaos! Crash Course Chemistry #20

Life is chaos and the universe tends toward disorder. But why? If you think about it, there are only a few ways for things to be arranged in an organized manner, but there are nearly infinite other ways for those same things to be arranged. Simple rules of probability dictate that it's much more likely for stuff to be in one of the many disorganized states than in one of the few organized states. This tendency is so unavoidable that it's known as the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Obviously, disorder is a pretty big deal in the universe and that makes it a pretty big deal in chemistry - it's such a big deal that scientists have a special name for it: entropy. In chemistry, entropy is the measure of molecular randomness, or disorder. For the next thirteen minutes, Hank hopes you will embrace the chaos as he teaches you about entropy.

--
Table of Contents
Second Law of Thermodynamics :45
Entropy 2:01
DEMONSTRATION! 4:28
BA(OH)2•8H2O+NH4Ci 10:25
J.W. Gibbs & Gibbs Free Energy 7:23


--
Want